Archive for the ‘Slides’ Category

Embracing Modern CMake

November 5, 2017

I spoke at the ACCU conference in April 2017 on the topic of Embracing Modern CMake. The talk was very well attended and received, but was unfortunately not recorded at the event. In September I gave the talk again at the Dublin C++ User Group, so that it could be recorded for the internet.

The slides are available here. The intention of the talk was to present a ‘gathered opinion’ about what Modern CMake is and how it should be written. I got a lot of input from CMake users on reddit which informed some of the content of the talk.

Much of the information about how to write Modern CMake is available in the CMake documentation, and there are many presentations these days advocating the use of modern patterns and commands, discouraging use of older commands. Two other talks from this year that I’m aware of and which are popular are:

It’s very pleasing to see so many well-received and informative talks about something that I worked so hard on designing (together with Brad King) and implementing so many years ago.

One of the points which I tried to labor a bit in my talk was just how old ‘Modern’ CMake is. I recently was asked in private email about the origin and definition of the term, so I’ll try to reproduce that information here.

I coined the term “Modern CMake” while preparing for Meeting C++ 2013, where I presented on the topic and the developments in CMake in the preceding years. Unfortunately (this happens to me a lot with CMake), the talk was not recorded, but I wrote a blog post with the slides and content. The slides are no longer on the KDAB website, but can be found here. Then already in 2013, the simple example with Qt shows the essence of Modern CMake:


find_package(Qt5Widgets 5.2 REQUIRED)

add_executable(myapp main.cpp)
target_link_libraries(myapp Qt5::Widgets)

Indeed, the first terse attempt at a definition of “Modern CMake” and first public appearance of the term with its current meaning was when I referred to it as approximately “CMake with usage requirements”. That’s when the term gained a capitalized ‘M’ and its current meaning and then started to gain traction.

The first usage I found of “Modern CMake” in private correspondence was March 13 2012 in an email exchange with Alex Neundorf about presenting together on the topic at a KDE conference:

Hi Alex

Are you planning on going to Talinn for Akademy this year? I was thinking about sumitting a talk along the lines of Qt5, KF5, CMake (possibly along the lines of the discussion of ‘modern CMake’ we had before with Clinton, and what KDE CMake files could look like as a result).

I thought maybe we should coordinate so either we don’t submit overlapping proposals, or we can submit a joint talk.

Thanks,

Steve.

The “discussion with Clinton” was probably this thread and the corresponding thread on the cmake mailing list where I started to become involved in what would become Modern CMake over the following years.

The talk was unfortunately not accepted to the conference, but here’s the submission:

Speakers: Stephen Kelly, Alexander Neundorf
Title: CMake in 2012 – Modernizing CMake usage in Qt5 and KDE Frameworks 5
Duration: 45 minutes

KDE Frameworks 5 (KF5) will mark the start of a new chapter in the history of KDE and of the KDE platform. Starting from a desire to make our developments more easy to use by 3rd parties and ‘Qt-only’ developers, the effort to create KF5 is partly one of embracing and extending upstreams to satisfy the needs of the KDE Platform, to enable a broadening of the user base of our technology.

As it is one of our most important upstreams, and as the tool we use to build our software, KDE relies on CMake to provide a high standard of quality and features. Throughout KDE 4 times, KDE has added extensions to CMake which we consider useful to all developers using Qt and C++. To the extent possible, we are adding those features upstream to CMake. Together with those features, we are providing feedback from 6 years of experience with CMake to ensure it continues to deliver an even more awesome build experience for at least the next 6 years. Qt5 and KF5 will work together with CMake in ways that were not possible in KDE 4 times.

The presentation will discuss the various aspects of the KDE buildsystem planned for KF5, both hidden and visible to the developer. These aspects will include the CMake automoc feature, the role of CMake configuration files, and how a target orientated and consistency driven approach could change how CMake will be used in the future.

There is a lot to recognize there in what has since come to pass and become common in Modern CMake usage, in particular the “target orientated and consistency driven approach” which is the core characteristic of Modern CMake.

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CMake Daemon for user tools

January 24, 2016

I’ve been working for quite some time on a daemon mode for CMake in order to make it easier to build advanced tooling for CMake. I made a video about this today:

The general idea is that CMake is started as a long-running process, and can then be communicated with via a JSON protocol.

So, for example, a client sends a request like

{
  "type": "code_completion_at",
  "line": 50,
  "path": "/home/stephen/dev/src/cmake-browser/CMakeLists.txt",
  "column": 7
}

and the daemon responds with

{  
   "completion":{  
      "commands":[  
         "target_compile_definitions",
         "target_compile_features",
         "target_compile_options",
         "target_include_directories",
         "target_link_libraries",
         "target_sources"
      ],
      "matcher":"target_"
   }
}
Many more features are implemented such as semantic annotation, variable introspection, contextual help etc, all without the client having to implement it themselves.
Aside from the daemon, I implemented a Qt client making use of all of the features, and a Kate plugin to use the debugging features in that editor. This is the subject of my talk at FOSDEM, which I previewed in Berlin last week.
Come to my talk there to learn more!

Slides from April

June 15, 2009

I still had the slides lying around from my talk at the Linux Collaboration Summit back in April, so I thought I’d post them here.

http://steveire.com/slides/lcs09Talk.pdf

The style and content is modified from Jos’ generic KDE4 presentation. The Pillars of KDE images were made by Kamaleshwar Morjal for FOSS.in a few years ago. Get them on Flickr in high res if you want to use them.