Posts Tagged ‘Qt’

Grantlee version 5.3 now available

September 10, 2022

I previously announced the end of new Qt5-based Grantlee releases. The Grantlee template system is to find new life as part of KDE Frameworks 6 in the form of KTextTemplate. The Grantlee textdocument library will probably become part of another KDE library with similar scope.

Meanwhile, some changes have accumulated since the last Grantlee release, so I’ve made a new release to make them available to users. Many of the changes are small, but with a few new features which were cherry-picked from the Cutelee repo.

The other significant change is that Grantlee 5.3.0 can be built with Qt 6. This is not a change of plan regarding migration to KDE Frameworks, but is intended to assist with porting existing code to Qt 6.

Speaking of new releases, we welcomed our baby into the world almost a year ago. Years ago it was a common refrain within the KDE community to new parents to remind them, tongue in cheek, to never shake the baby. I was amused to find that the advise given as a printed book to all new Irish parents reminds the same :).

CMake Daemon for user tools

January 24, 2016

I’ve been working for quite some time on a daemon mode for CMake in order to make it easier to build advanced tooling for CMake. I made a video about this today:

The general idea is that CMake is started as a long-running process, and can then be communicated with via a JSON protocol.

So, for example, a client sends a request like

{
  "type": "code_completion_at",
  "line": 50,
  "path": "/home/stephen/dev/src/cmake-browser/CMakeLists.txt",
  "column": 7
}

and the daemon responds with

{  
   "completion":{  
      "commands":[  
         "target_compile_definitions",
         "target_compile_features",
         "target_compile_options",
         "target_include_directories",
         "target_link_libraries",
         "target_sources"
      ],
      "matcher":"target_"
   }
}
Many more features are implemented such as semantic annotation, variable introspection, contextual help etc, all without the client having to implement it themselves.
Aside from the daemon, I implemented a Qt client making use of all of the features, and a Kate plugin to use the debugging features in that editor. This is the subject of my talk at FOSDEM, which I previewed in Berlin last week.
Come to my talk there to learn more!